Top Stories

September 15, 2021
Journalism Institute honors The Marshall Project with the Sheehan Award for Investigative Journalism

WASHINGTON, Sept. 15, 2021 — The Marshall Project, a nonprofit news organization covering the U.S. criminal justice system, will receive the National Press Club Journalism Institute’s 2021 Neil and Susan Sheehan Award for Investigative Journalism. Through award-winning journalism, The Marshall Project has revealed fundamental flaws within the criminal justice system and engages millions of people…


September 13, 2021
Managers: Take a few minutes to talk about nothing special

A recent New York Times article struck me as truly sad. “If you never met your co-workers in person, did you even work there?” shares stories of people who started remote jobs during the pandemic, never made deep personal connections, and quit. One of my favorite leadership scholars sums it up neatly: “If you’re in…


September 1, 2021
5 tips for reporting on polls

Not all polls are created equal. How can journalists spot a bad or biased poll and avoid amplifying it? Treat pollsters and polling companies the same as any other source. Just like any source, pollsters can get facts wrong. And sometimes there are bad actors that are not taking a rigorous scientific approach to their data….


August 30, 2021
Say goodbye with grace

The “Great Resignation” is real. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, nearly 4 million workers quit their jobs in June of this year, a big jump over 2020. People who were hunkered down during the pandemic, reluctant to switch jobs as the world was in disarray, are making changes in their lives. Journalists…


August 24, 2021
‘Everything goes back to education’: 5 ways to transform coverage

Education reporters have documented the pandemic’s enormous effects on students, parents, teachers, administrators, and their communities. With policies changing quickly, how can an education reporter lift the voices of those most impacted?  These speakers joined a National Press Club Journalism Institute program to offer strategies for shaping stories driven by the voices of those underrepresented…


August 23, 2021
When one team works for many — learn how to become the ‘favorite’

There’s a special place in my heart for teams whose expertise supports multiple others across an organization: IT, marketing/communications, design, research, legal, operations, HR, maintenance. On any given day, these professionals get assignments, inquiries, requests, and yes, even demands — from other teams, including yours. Working for and with a variety of departments brings a…


August 11, 2021
5 strategies to uncover bias in data

A poll, survey, or other dataset may look like an example of objective truth. But human choices shape the creation of a data product — and its interpretation. So how can journalists fairly report on this data? To answer this question, the National Press Club Journalism Institute and the National Association of Science Writers (NASW)…


August 9, 2021
Managers: Your words matter, so avoid these

When you become a manager, your words have greater impact than you know. Your specific and sincere praise can make someone’s day. Your criticisms can burn more than you know.  Your language also defines your leadership style, for better or worse. To avoid the “worse” option, I suggest you avoid these statements: There are lots…


August 2, 2021
Managers: What do your meetings say about your culture?

You can learn a lot about a team’s culture simply by watching how their meetings run. You might be too accustomed to your own habits (that’s what culture is about) to see what an outsider would. But imagine for a moment that someone is taking notes on how things go. How do people relate to…


July 26, 2021
Managers: 4 important things to remember about difficult conversations

Managers often struggle with difficult conversations. They put off talking about performance issues because they don’t feel fully prepared, don’t believe it will make things better, or just don’t like confrontation. We’re not helping people when we keep our concerns to ourselves; we’re denying people a chance to learn and grow. It doesn’t mean they’ll…


July 23, 2021
‘Get out there’: 4 strategies to improve and diversify housing coverage

Millions of residents in the U.S. risk losing their housing as a federal moratorium on evictions is expected to expire at the end of the month. Journalists who cover this critical situation have an opportunity to break out of old habits. That starts by reporting through an equity lens, said panelists at a National Press Club Journalism…


July 16, 2021
NPF, NPCJI award $57,000 to six grantees for environmental justice journalism

The National Press Foundation and the National Press Club Journalism Institute announced today that they will jointly award $57,049 in grants to journalists who plan to cover environmental justice. The six grantees were selected by judges Antonia Juhasz, Yanick Rice Lamb, and Harriet Washington, distinguished journalists and teachers who have produced notable work in exposing environmental racism and…


July 12, 2021
Managers: Does your team play well with others?

You know my mantra: The most important thing leaders do is help others succeed. To achieve that goal, managers coach people on performance, provide ongoing feedback, listen to their hopes and fears, and challenge them with stretch assignments.  There’s another thing they should do that managers sometimes miss: set clear expectations about collaboration across teams,…


July 7, 2021
New virtual meetups that focus on how journalists’ work, lives intersect will start in August

Journalism takes us places we might not otherwise see, leads us to people we might not otherwise meet, and prompts us to capture experiences we might not otherwise document. And journalists often carry those stories with them long after they are published. Whether you travel across the country or across the street for work, “You…


July 6, 2021
Going hybrid? 3 values to help guide you and your team through this transition

Some of your team members can’t wait to regroup in your headquarters. Others hope to work remotely. As you create your post-pandemic work structure, you are navigating a number of important goals: high quality in whatever you produce, high performance on your staff (both individuals and teams), growth and innovation, and engaged employees who enjoy…


June 28, 2021
Three ways to say ‘no’ – shamelessly

The pandemic has caused many of us to rethink our time and priorities. People are leaving jobs, learning new skills, moving, asking for re-designed work arrangements, and questioning their previous business travel habits. As we settle in to “new normal” patterns at work and in our personal lives, we may find ourselves wanting to decline…


June 21, 2021
4 must-have skills for today’s managers

In 2020, managers had to lead instant change, driven by the pandemic. For some it was a smoother process than others because of their talent for helping people navigate new skills and survive new stresses. For those less adept, their teams paid the price in terms of quality, productivity, and morale. Now change is upon…


June 14, 2021
5 keys to a ‘high-performing happy hybrid’ culture

I’ve worked with lots of media leaders and teams who wanted to upgrade their cultures. They wanted to improve things like breaking news/big story dominance, or multi-platform production and delivery, or audience-centric focus — and bake it into the culture. Or they wanted to foster workplace environments where communication and feedback, diversity, equity, and inclusion, collaboration, or respect and…


June 10, 2021
‘Nobody is ever just a victim’: 6 tips for journalists covering hate crimes

Amid rising attacks on racial, ethnic and religious groups, journalists are navigating the complex terrain around what constitutes a hate crime. So how can they cover hate crimes and other attacks on vulnerable populations? Here are some tips from a National Press Club Journalism Institute panel on Wednesday. First, understand what constitutes a hate crime The…


June 7, 2021
Great bosses avoid ‘one-size-fits-all’ feedback

Feedback is one of the most important tools in a manager’s toolkit, and too often, it is underutilized. It’s not just that bosses withhold it — although sadly, some do — it’s that those who dispense it need to upgrade it. To understand what I mean, here’s my definition of this critical tool: Feedback is…


June 2, 2021
You, your boss and your staff: Who’s talking to whom?

Here’s a quick quiz for managers: You see one of your team members having a conversation with YOUR boss. Is your response: I’m uncomfortable because I fear that staffer is doing an end run around me I’m curious about what they’re discussing, but not concerned about it I’m glad to see people getting time and…


May 26, 2021
LinkedIn for journalism job seekers: 5 steps to a stronger profile

With nearly 770 million users worldwide, LinkedIn is a growing network for professional development. Every week, 40 million people are using LinkedIn to search for jobs. And every minute, three people are hired through LinkedIn.  This makes the platform a valuable resource for job-seeking journalists, as more than 95 percent of recruiters use LinkedIn regularly. …


May 25, 2021
New research gives journalists fresh insights for rebuilding trust

Sixty percent of Americans say they have little to no trust in the media to report the news fully, accurately, and fairly, according to Gallup. Republicans are far less trusting of news than Democrats, and marginalized communities have long mistrusted the media because they didn’t see their experiences represented on the front page or on the…


May 24, 2021
Rule number one of managing your boss — and why it matters

Staffers and managers have this in common: They both have bosses. In organizations, everyone reports to someone. Even the CEO has a board to reckon with.  Relationships with those bosses are important, and most managers are “manageable” — if you care to invest the time and effort.  I hope you do. Learn how to communicate…


May 20, 2021
Your career GPS: Journalism hiring managers on how to make the best next turn

What makes a job applicant stand out to hiring managers at top news organizations?  Priska Neely, managing editor for Gulf States Newsroom, Traci Schweikert, chief talent officer at POLITICO, and Mizell Stewart III, vice president of news performance, talent and partnerships for Gannett/USA Today Network, kicked off a weeklong career workshop hosted by the National…


May 18, 2021
New grants provide $100,000 for reporting on environmental justice

The National Press Foundation and the National Press Club Journalism Institute announced today that they will jointly sponsor a program that will award up to $100,000 in grants to journalists who plan to cover environmental justice. Grants ranging from $10,000 to $25,000 will be awarded to support journalism in any medium that centers environmental justice…


May 17, 2021
To lead or to follow: What role should leaders play in important gatherings?

When news organizations plan workshops on improving culture, communication, conflict resolution, change or other aspects of organizational life, managers sometimes struggle with one well-intentioned question:  “What role, if any, should I play? Is there a chance my presence will keep people from speaking candidly? Might things go better without me there?” I appreciate that they…


May 10, 2021
So you’re considering becoming a manager: 6 things to know

When your bosses ask you to join their ranks, it’s generally considered a good thing. It means people appreciate the quality of your work and your ideas. They may have observed your influence on others as an informal leader. They’re willing to bet that you can build on that base talent and goodwill through a…


May 3, 2021
7 reasons job candidates turn you down (and employees leave)

A promising job candidate turned down your offer. You’re frustrated, of course, especially if that person politely declined but didn’t elaborate on their reasons, even when you pressed.  What went wrong with the courtship? Why did you get all the way to the altar, only to be abandoned before the “I do”? It’s always possible…


April 28, 2021
Managers: How to be a ‘strategic interrupter’

Growing up, you may have been admonished by family or teachers that it is rude to interrupt people. It is.  And yet we do it. (*Points at self*) We have our reasons for interrupting others, not all of them bad. But even the good-to-neutral ones have downsides and must be managed carefully. Let’s review reasons,…


April 27, 2021
New scholarship supports diversity in broadcast journalism

A newly established broadcast journalism scholarship supports diversity within the field while honoring longtime radio journalist Wes Vernon, a former National Press Club member.  The Wes Vernon Broadcast Scholarship will provide $5,000 annually to a student who demonstrates a commitment to a career in broadcast journalism. The award can be renewed up to three years…


April 23, 2021
New reading group will start with book about the ‘Founding Mothers of NPR’

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is starting a reading group for people who love journalism and books and want to discuss them both. The first book we’ll discuss is “Susan, Linda, Nina & Cokie: The Extraordinary Story of the Founding Mothers of NPR.” Be sure to register for an event on Thursday, April 29…


April 22, 2021
Journalists: Are you emotionally exhausted? Signs to watch for and how to ask for help

Many journalists are already there, and many more are on the precipice: emotional exhaustion brought on by a combination of professional and personal stressors. What can we do? Rich Glickstein, a trauma therapist, social worker and former photojournalist, shares with the Institute how journalists and their editors can identify burnout, and how (and when) to…


April 19, 2021
A friendly communication reminder to managers

Here’s a truth that will surprise no one in journalism. Media organizations — filled with professional communicators — often do a poor job of communicating with staff. It’s a challenge in the best of times, and it’s even more complicated, clumsy and error prone these days. People are dispersed. Our virtual meetings range from effective…


April 12, 2021
Managers: What’s the secret to being ‘approachable’?

As a manager, it’s good to be known as smart and results-oriented; to have people respect your knowledge and track record. But accomplished leaders can be intimidating to others – and not even know it. They find out when their company does a culture survey, 360 feedback, or from someone on their team who just…


April 6, 2021
Managers: Avoid these mistakes when identifying ‘emerging leaders’

If ever there was a time to focus on up-and-coming talent in news leadership, this is it. Specifically, it’s time to re-think how we bless certain people as “emerging leaders.” If the media industry had been doing it right, its management ranks would be far more diverse and better than they are today.  So, let’s…


March 31, 2021
‘Free to view is not free to take’: 3 media lawyers on copyright and fair use tips for journalists

Copyright violation is a rising legal risk for media professionals, said litigator and former journalist Chuck Tobin at a National Press Club Journalism Institute program on Wednesday.  “A generation ago we would probably be focusing more on defamation law,” he said. “But copyright law is the biggest growing area that we’ve seen in our media law practice…


March 29, 2021
How do you define ‘high performers’?

I asked a recent class of managers to think about some high performers on their teams. One of the participants asked: “How do you define a high performer?” Her question was driven by a concern that managers may have very subjective views on performance. For example, she said, what about bosses who judge people by…


March 26, 2021
AI for news: How it’s being used, common challenges, and solutions

“As knowledge workers, we are all becoming information officers,” said computational journalist Francesco Marconi. “The reality is that AI in data will become a crucial tool in our functions as we go forward.”  Marconi discussed how artificial intelligence is changing media at a program on March 26 hosted by the National Press Club Journalism Institute in…


March 22, 2021
How to push back productively

We’re in a conversation or brainstorming session and it happens: We push back on peoples’ ideas with skeptical questions, enumeration of obstacles, lists of things that are more important, or even arguments about validity. When I wrote recently about “automatic pushback” — how to anticipate and respond to it, I heard from a lot of…


March 16, 2021
‘From an informed place’: ‘Bamboo ceiling’ headline writer responds to criticism with context

As actors Steven Yeun and Youn Yuh-jung made Oscars history Monday, The Hollywood Reporter published the headline, “Oscars: Diverse field sees Asian actors shatter a bamboo ceiling.” Rankled readers criticized the publication on Twitter, saying the term “bamboo ceiling” was offensive. Many were unaware that the term originated from leadership strategist Jane Hyun, who used…


March 8, 2021
Margaret Brennan of ‘Face The Nation’ on hyper-partisanship, trust in media and fact-checking guests

Hosting a Sunday news program requires “being allergic to ideology” and the ability to question everything, Margaret Brennan says. “In this age of hyper partisanship and hot takes, it is a constant mission to bring clarity around an issue,” said Brennan, who recently celebrated her three-year anniversary of hosting “Face The Nation.” Brennan has guided…


March 1, 2021
3 tips on accessing public records from home

Public records are like the mirepoix of journalism: They serve as the base of a complex story. With documents in hand, reporters can uncover everything from how a gas company undermined the city of Austin’s climate change proposal to whether certain public figures have paid their taxes.  We asked Mark Walker, Freedom of Information Act…


February 26, 2021
‘Everything has to live on its own’: Top tips from an audience journalist

As much of Texas plunged into darkness earlier this month, Bobby Blanchard and his colleagues at the Texas Tribune sprung into action.   From launching a texting service to keep readers informed during power outages to fielding pressing questions from readers, audience engagement was critically important to serving the community.  But what does a typical day…


February 25, 2021
‘Try to pace yourself’: 3 tips on covering the aftermath of extreme weather events

After a major breaking news event like the Texas storms, what should local journalists prioritize next in their coverage? We reached out to reporter St. John Barned-Smith, who covers public safety at the Houston Chronicle, for some ideas. Following the Texas storms last week, residents are dealing with everything from unsafe drinking water to damage…


February 23, 2021
How an ex-NASA engineer is fighting bias in media with Ground News

Former NASA engineer Harleen Kaur is working to shatter people’s news filter bubbles. She co-founded Ground News with Sukh Singh to help combat disinformation, fake news and media biases. The platform compares how news sources across the political spectrum cover major stories.  Each headline is accompanied by a coverage analysis that shows what sources on…


February 22, 2021
Managers: How to deal with ‘automatic pushback’

I’m here today to save you some headaches and heartburn, the kind that arise when you feel weighed down by opposition and negativity. Ready for some preventive medicine? Read on: As a manager, you have the joy — and challenge — of introducing new ideas, duties, assignments and projects to your staff members. In your…


February 17, 2021
‘There is no pandemic exception’: What salaried and freelance journalists need to know about filing taxes

The 2021 tax filing season is officially underway with the IRS accepting and processing 2020 tax year returns until April 15, 2021. The pandemic disrupted so much, journalists may be wondering what changed when it comes to taxes. We reached out to tax lawyer Kelly Phillips Erb, team lead, insights & commentary at Bloomberg Industry…


February 16, 2021
What are key differences between good and bad managers?

In seminars, I’ve asked people to think about the best bosses they ever worked for.  We list their skills, qualities and values. Inevitably, the chart includes: Vision Knowledge Ethics Emotional intelligence Courage Communication Inclusion Humor Teaching/coaching Encouragement High standards  Team builder Honesty It’s not uncommon for people to point out that they also learned from…


February 5, 2021
Top 3 self-care tips for journalists from NPR’s Life Kit managing producer

Need a little assistance getting your life in order?  Enter NPR’s Life Kit — a life skills podcast and newsletter offering advice on topics from health and personal finances to parenting and relationships.  We reached out to Meghan Keane, Life Kit’s founder and managing producer, to find out how the team selects what advice resonates…


February 2, 2021
Are you ‘pandemic fine’? How to ask for help in your newsroom (and your life)

As Houston Chronicle reporter Sarah Smith pointed out on Twitter, there is a new state of being — “pandemic fine” — that is both relatable and exhausting: Her remedy: asking for help. We reached out to Smith by email to hear her advice for journalists on what, when and whom to ask.  How do you…


February 1, 2021
‘He didn’t stop there’: How an ex-slave became a newspaper publisher in Virginia

As with many African Americans, I knew fragments of my family history. My sister and I got bits and pieces from our parents and other relatives. But that information was painfully deficient compared to the comprehensive collection of data and evidence that began to surface after my cousin Denise Lester actually moved to Richmond, Va.,…


February 1, 2021
Manager-to-Manager: Are you a collaborator or a competitor?

In an ideal world, managers look out for each other. They understand one another’s responsibilities, joys and challenges. They are inclined to say yes to requests for help. They communicate clearly, so everyone’s viewpoints are understood, even when they conflict.  And they do conflict. Resources may be limited. Visions of success might differ.  One manager’s…


January 29, 2021
News or opinion? How the WSJ is showing readers the difference

Is your audience “news literate”?  According to The Media Insight Project, there is a public disconnect surrounding basic news terminology: Half their survey respondents didn’t know what an “op-ed” was. (And three in 10 were unclear on the difference between “editorial” and “news story.”) This confusion only adds to the deteriorating trust that Americans have…


January 28, 2021
‘Whatever your beat, the environment and climate … are already a part of it,’ says oil & energy journalist

The Biden-Harris administration has signaled a dramatic shift on climate policy.  In the wake of “Climate Day” — the flurry of environmental executive orders signed on Jan. 27 — we asked energy and climate author Antonia Juhasz how journalists can prepare to cover the climate crisis.  “Reporting on the Biden administration’s executive orders and other…


January 27, 2021
10 newsletters to help your writing

Stephen King famously said: “If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write.” Whether you’re striving to improve your craft or aim pitches better, here are 10 newsletters to add to your reading list.   Chip in Your Inbox: Every week, writing coach Chip Scanlan provides lessons and…


January 26, 2021
Make better decisions: 4 ways to be your own coach

Every decision we make requires us to size up a situation.  Sometimes we have the benefit of empirical data. But often, we rely on a combination of experience, expectations, assumptions and — because we’re human — a little emotion.  Here are some examples: You’ve applied for a job. The interview seemed to go well. Four…


January 21, 2021
Leaders: Never forget your power to make someone’s day

When leaders tell me about a high-performing employee or a boss they admire, I often respond with a question: “Have you told that person what you just told me?” Often, the response is, “You know, I really should do that.” For whatever reason — they’re busy, they assume good people know they’re good, or they…


January 19, 2021
Inauguration Day reporting: 10 safety tips

When the U.S. Capitol was under siege on Jan. 6, at least nine journalists were physically attacked as well. Last week, the FBI issued a warning that armed protestors could infiltrate state capitols and Washington, D.C., in the lead-up to Inauguration Day.  As journalists prepare to cover this week’s events across the country, we’ve rounded…


January 15, 2021
‘Your writing is the strongest when it arrives in your own voice’: Dallas Morning News editor on writing in 2021

With the help of inspiring journalists, we learned about writing in many different ways over the last year — from sharing about personal loss to evoking emotions through detail; and finding your focus to turning your memories into a memoir. As we enter the new year, we reached out to our previous writing program instructors…


January 15, 2021
‘Take a pause before saying yes’: 3 journalists on their 2021 writing resolutions

With the help of inspiring journalists, we learned about writing in many different ways over the last year — from sharing about personal loss to evoking emotions through detail; and finding your focus to turning your memories into a memoir. As we enter the new year, we reached out to our previous writing program instructors…


January 15, 2021
‘Writing is a comfort’: Memoirists Mindy Greiling and Abby Maslin on their 2021 writing resolutions

With the help of inspiring journalists, we learned about writing in many different ways over the last year — from sharing about personal loss to evoking emotions through detail; and finding your focus to turning your memories into a memoir. As we enter the new year, we reached out to our previous writing program instructors…


January 14, 2021
Class of 2020: Where are they now? Nicola Wenz

The next generation of journalists graduated in 2020 into a challenging job market unlike any other. We spotlighted them last summer, shared advice from their role models, and are checking in with them to see where they are now and what they’re learning about journalism.  Name: Nicola Wenz School: University of Southern California  Where are…


January 14, 2021
Class of 2020: Where are they now? Malak Silmi

The next generation of journalists graduated in 2020 into a challenging job market unlike any other. We spotlighted them last summer, shared advice from their role models, and are checking in with them to see where they are now and what they’re learning about journalism.  Name: Malak Silmi School: Wayne State University (Michigan) Where are…


January 14, 2021
Class of 2020: Where are they now? Rob Kleifield

The next generation of journalists graduated in 2020 into a challenging job market unlike any other. We spotlighted them last summer, shared advice from their role models, and are checking in with them to see where they are now and what they’re learning about journalism.  Name: Rob Kleifield  School: Arizona State University Where are you…


January 12, 2021
NYT’s ‘Caliphate’ under new scrutiny. Editors share investigative audio journalism tips: ‘The same rules apply’

The New York Times is acknowledging this afternoon that it made mistakes in handling the demise of “Caliphate,” its investigative podcast that was partially retracted.  When executive editor Dean Baquet went on “The Daily” to discuss the decision, he seemed to suggest that the news organization was still learning how to apply the same standards…


January 11, 2021
With Capitol Police not subject to FOIA, ‘basic fundamental questions go unanswered’

Why were the Capitol Police so unprepared on January 6?  As journalists unpack the Capitol Police’s response to the mob, a long-standing roadblock persists: The department is not subject to the Freedom of Information Act.    Chris Marquette is an ethics and accountability reporter at CQ Roll Call who covers the Capitol Police and explains different…


January 11, 2021
Newsroom leaders: How to help your team cope

I spent the weekend trying to prepare for teaching this week on allyship. It was nearly impossible to concentrate. Like anyone in journalism, I couldn’t disconnect from the unfolding news about the assault on the Capitol. Every new image adds layers of information. But they also have a remarkable consistency.  The insurrectionists radiated hate. Let…


January 11, 2021
Annual Report: Journalism Institute tripled programs in 2020, grew reach by 770%

The National Press Club Journalism Institute expanded its programming, services and reach in 2020, a year marked for journalists by coverage of the global coronavirus pandemic, systemic racial inequities in and out of newsrooms, and an election cycle unlike any other.  The Institute seized opportunities to serve journalists, communicators and the public, as outlined in…


January 8, 2021
Be alert, news leaders: Guidance from NPR’s chief diversity officer

What can newsrooms do to help journalists cope with the trauma of seeing colleagues threatened and attacked by a mob storming the U.S. Capitol, sending a clear message: “Murder the media”? Keith Woods, Chief Diversity Officer at NPR, shares how leaders can support their teams, particularly journalists of color, during this tumultuous time. From your…


January 8, 2021
‘Race is the story’: AP investigative reporter on the coverage Americans need next

Wednesday’s siege at the U.S. Capitol held a mirror up for America to see itself, plainly showcasing deep-seeded inequity in the treatment of law-breaking white supporters of President Trump and the peaceful social justice protests of summer 2020.  “Many Black Americans, leaders, activists and even President-elect Joe Biden noted in the aftermath that had that…


January 7, 2021
Newsroom leaders: Be big, bold, empathetic and angry

Advice from Jill Geisler, Bill Plante Chair in Leadership & Media Integrity, Loyola University Chicago and Freedom Forum Fellow in Women’s Leadership My local paper, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, used a one word headline to describe January 6, 2021: Insurrection. It was big, bold and accurate. That’s what we need from news leaders right now:…


January 6, 2021
Class of 2020: Where are they now? Joe Snell

The next generation of journalists graduated in 2020 into a challenging job market unlike any other. We spotlighted them last summer, shared advice from their role models, and are checking in with them to see where they are now and what they’re learning about journalism.   Name: Joe Snell School: Northwestern University, Medill School of Journalism…


January 5, 2021
Writers Elizabeth Flock and Lori Gottlieb share their 2021 writing resolutions and what influenced them last year

With the help of inspiring journalists, we learned about writing in many different ways over the last year — from sharing about personal loss to evoking emotions through detail; and finding your focus to turning your memories into a memoir. As we enter the new year, we reached out to our previous writing program instructors…


January 5, 2021
Class of 2020: Where are they now? Anna Ta

The next generation of journalists graduated in 2020 into a challenging job market unlike any other. We spotlighted them last summer, shared advice from their role models, and are checking in with them to see where they are now and what they’re learning about journalism.  Name: Anna Ta School: Rice University   Current job: Upcoming internship,…


January 4, 2021
What’s your 2021 writing resolution? Washington Post’s Jessica Contrera shares hers

With the help of inspiring journalists, we learned about writing in many different ways over the last year — from sharing about personal loss to evoking emotions through detail; and finding your focus to turning your memories into a memoir. As we enter the new year, we reached out to our previous writing program instructors to hear about their 2021 writing resolutions.   …


January 4, 2021
Class of 2020: Where are they now? Michael Tobin

The next generation of journalists graduated in 2020 into a challenging job market unlike any other. We spotlighted them last summer, shared advice from their role models, and are checking in with them  to see where they are now and what they’re learning about journalism.  Name: Michael Tobin School: University of Oregon Current Job: Bloomberg…


December 23, 2020
‘Readers are looking for empathy and candor’: WaPo audience editor on how pandemic reporting is service journalism

Throughout 2020, journalists across the country have shared their best practices for working through the pandemic. As we approach 2021, we’re asking what they learned this year and what they hope to learn in the year to come.  Name: Steven Johnson Current job: Audience editor, Washington Post Previous Institute Q&A: Washington Post launches newsletter to…


December 23, 2020
Class of 2020: Where are they now? Shabnam Danesh

The next generation of journalists graduated in 2020 into a challenging job market unlike any other. We spotlighted them this summer, shared advice from their role models, and are checking in with them this month to see where they are now and what they’re learning about journalism.  Name: Shabnam Danesh School: American University Job: Reporter,…


December 22, 2020
‘It’s crucial to focus on the small towns and rural areas’: Weather Channel reporter on 2020 coverage lessons

Throughout 2020, journalists across the country have shared their best practices for working through the pandemic. As we approach 2021, we’re asking what they learned this year and what they hope to learn in the year to come.  Name: Tevin Wooten  Current job: Emmy® award-winning weather reporter and an on-camera meteorologist, The Weather Channel television…


December 22, 2020
Class of 2020: Where are they now? Elise Dean

The next generation of journalists graduated in 2020 into a challenging job market unlike any other. We spotlighted them this summer, shared advice from their role models, and are checking in with them this month to see where they are now and what they’re learning about journalism.  Name: Elise Dean School: American University Current job:…


December 21, 2020
Class of 2020: Where are they now? Donny Morrison

The next generation of journalists graduated in 2020 into a challenging job market unlike any other. We spotlighted them this summer, shared advice from their role models, and are checking in with them this month to see where they are now and what they’re learning about journalism.  Name: Donny Morrison School: University of Oregon Current…


December 21, 2020
‘Adapting was easier’: Boston Globe editorial page editor reflects on 2020 coverage

Throughout 2020, journalists across the country have shared their best practices for working through the pandemic. As we approach 2021, we’re asking what they learned this year and what they hope to learn in the year to come.  Name: Bina Venkataraman Current job: Editorial page editor, Boston Globe Previous Institute Q&A: Why the Boston Globe…


December 18, 2020
Class of 2020: Where are they now? Sam Cabral

The next generation of journalists graduated in 2020 into a challenging job market unlike any other. We spotlighted them this summer, shared advice from their role models, and are checking in with them this month to see where they are now and what they’re learning about journalism.  Name: Sam Cabral School: Northwestern University, Medill School…


December 17, 2020
‘Being virtual means we’re more accessible’; UNC’s editor-in-chief reflects on how remote work changed the newsroom

Throughout 2020, journalists across the country have shared their best practices for working through the pandemic. As we approach 2021, we’re asking what they learned this year and what they hope to learn in the year to come.  Name: Anna Pogarcic  Current job: Editor-in-chief, The Daily Tar Heel, University of North Carolina Previous Institute Q&As:…


December 17, 2020
Class of 2020: Where are they now? Brandon Ruiz-Peña

The next generation of journalists graduated in 2020 into a challenging job market unlike any other. We spotlighted them this summer, shared advice from their role models, and are checking in with them this month to see where they are now and what they’re learning about journalism.  Name: Brandon Ruiz-Peña School: University of Houston-Clear Lake…


December 17, 2020
The Leadership Class of 2020: 10 lessons learned

If experience is a great teacher, then our annus horribilis was a graduate course in leading through change and challenge.  Consider this column a commencement address for the Leadership Class of 2020, recognizing the good work accomplished, the stress endured, but most important: the lessons learned.   Here are ten of them, dear graduates: When it…


December 16, 2020
Class of 2020: Where are they now? Dan Toomey

The next generation of journalists graduated in 2020 into a challenging job market unlike any other. We spotlighted them this summer, shared advice from their role models, and are checking in with them this month to see where they are now and what they’re learning about journalism.  Name: Dan Toomey School: The University of Southern…


December 16, 2020
‘Ready for transformative change’: How the Media 2070 creators are building on the newsroom reckonings for 2021

Throughout 2020, journalists across the country have shared their best practices for working through the pandemic. As we approach 2021, we’re asking what they learned this year and what they hope to learn in the year to come.  Names: Alicia Bell, Collette Watson & Joseph Torres Current role: Three creators of Media 2070  Previous Institute…


December 15, 2020
Class of 2020: Where are they now? Jishnu Nair

The next generation of journalists graduated in 2020 into a challenging job market unlike any other. We spotlighted them this summer, shared advice from their role models, and are checking in with them this month to see where they are now and what they’re learning about journalism.  Name: Jishnu Nair School: Syracuse University Current job:…


December 15, 2020
‘When you’re sure, be brave’: Atlantic staff writer shares coronavirus reporting lessons from 2020

Throughout 2020, journalists across the country have shared their best practices for working through the pandemic. As we approach 2021, we’re asking what they learned this year and what they hope to learn in the year to come.  Name: Olga Khazan Current job: Staff writer, The Atlantic Previous Institute Q&A: Embracing the ‘weird’: Health reporter…


December 14, 2020
Class of 2020: Where are they now? Jenna Ortiz

The next generation of journalists graduated in 2020 into a challenging job market unlike any other. We spotlighted them this summer, shared advice from their role models, and are checking in with them this month to see where they are now and what they’re learning about journalism.  Name: Jenna Ortiz School: Arizona State University Current…


December 14, 2020
‘Question everything’: Global health reporter on lessons for 2021

Throughout 2020, journalists across the country have shared their best practices for working through the pandemic. As we approach 2021, we’re asking what they learned this year and what they hope to learn in the year to come.  Name: Apoorva Mandavilli Current job: Science and global health reporter, The New York Times Previous Institute Q&A:…


December 11, 2020
‘Reporters have to be even more sensitive these days’: Freelance journalist reflects on 2020

Throughout 2020, journalists across the country have shared their best practices for working through the pandemic. As we approach 2021, we’re asking what they learned this year and what they hope to learn in the year to come.  Name: Wesley S. WrightCurrent job: Freelance reporter and academic adviser at Florida State UniversityPrevious Institute Q&A: SPJ…


December 10, 2020
Class of 2020: Where are they now? Frankie McLister

The next generation of journalists graduated in 2020 into a challenging job market unlike any other. We spotlighted them this summer, shared advice from their role models, and are checking in with them this month to see where they are now and what they’re learning about journalism.  Name: Frankie McListerSchool: Arizona State University – Walter…


December 10, 2020
‘We can adapt to the most difficult of situations’: Executive editor on powering through fatigue

As we approach 2021, we’re asking journalists to share what they learned this year and what they hope to do better in the year to come.  Name: Jessica McAllister Current job: Executive editor, Centre Daily Times Previous Institute Q&A: What education reporting looks like now in a college town What are the main lessons you learned this…


December 9, 2020
NPR TV critic on what he’s learned in 2020 and hopes to learn in 2021

Throughout 2020, journalists across the country have shared their best practices for working through the pandemic. As we approach 2021, we’re asking what they learned this year and what they hope to learn in the next year.  While the pandemic has eliminated some opportunities for journalists, says media writer Eric Deggans, it has created new…


December 8, 2020
Class of 2020: Where are they now? Kelly Kimball

The next generation of journalists graduated in 2020 into a challenging job market unlike any other. We spotlighted them this summer, shared advice from their role models, and are checking in with them this month to see where they are now and what they’re learning about journalism.  Name: Kelly KimballSchool: American UniversityCurrent job: Social Media…


December 8, 2020
‘Follow the facts’: DC political reporter moves down south

A common misconception about Southern voters, says political reporter Patricia Murphy, is that they are “not informed and sophisticated.”  “They are voting in what they consider their best interests, even if that’s different from what an assignment desk in New York thinks it should be,” said Murphy, who joined the Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s politics team after…


December 3, 2020
Leaders: We have a lot of catching up to do

To lead is to take the long view while never losing sight of today. You build systems and hire good people to ensure the daily efforts run as smoothly and successfully as possible. You check in to make sure that we’re doing well in the moment — but at the same time, you are looking…


November 19, 2020
‘This isn’t a vocation, it’s a calling’: Susan Zirinsky, Ed Yong, Maria Ressa and Linda Tirado exemplify journalism excellence

At a time when journalism is under threat in the U.S. and around the world — with a global pandemic bearing down — hundreds of attendees gathered virtually for the Fourth Estate Award Gala, to celebrate four incredible journalists who have made significant contributions to the field.  Here are highlights from honorees Susan Zirinsky, Ed Yong,…


November 16, 2020
The secret to inspiring leadership

I’ve been asked by managers to help them find the way to become an inspiring leader. Those who ask are usually concerned that they lack charisma or oratorical skills. You don’t necessarily need either to inspire others. They can help, but are not what’s at the core of inspiration. Here’s the secret: It’s love. Think…


November 11, 2020
Are you considering a side hustle?

When the pandemic hit, advertising art director Laura Woodside saw an opportunity to try something new outside of the work day. In addition to launching a custom T-shirt business with her husband, she now uses her creative arts background to freelance. We reached out to Woodside to find out how she balances a full-time position…


November 9, 2020
Lead like it is January

News managers, I’m sure you’ve thanked your crews by now. You’ve sent people off to get some rest. You’ve taken note of every smart thing you’ve done in covering this year’s election. You’re doing an after-action review of lessons learned. I’m here to nudge you further into the future. Start working right now as though…


November 2, 2020
How the Big Story brings out our best

You’re busy working on election coverage, so I’ll keep this brief.  Knowing what others need is the secret to great teamwork during big stories and breaking news. That’s why we: Communicate with clarity and speed. Stay focused on what matters. Double check our work, our gear, and our assumptions. Set aside petty differences in service…


October 30, 2020
How yoga stretched one journalist past burnout

Leslie Rangel tried yoga for the first time as a student at the University of Texas in Austin. It was a challenging Bikram class and, even though a fall at the end resulted in “a split open chin and bruise,” she was hooked.  During her second TV job in Oklahoma City, she started her journey…


October 27, 2020
‘Our staff was burning out’: Why this student publication went dark for a week

The University of South Carolina’s student news organization has returned to work after a week-long hiatus that they took in an effort to prioritize mental health and self-care.  “We’re not OK,” The Daily Gamecock editorial staff shared with their audience on Oct. 18. Other media outlets have expressed their support (and criticism) of the decision. We reached out to Rita Naidu —…


October 26, 2020
Managers, it’s Election ‘Murphy’ time

Think about a time you couldn’t wait to come to work. What was the story, the project, the event that was so motivating? Whenever I ask that question in my news management workshops, one answer always surfaces: Election Day. So many factors come together to cause journalists to work with rigor, resilience and joy. No…


October 22, 2020
The most likely polling errors in 2020 and how journalists can avoid being misled by them

A deluge of polling data threatens to overwhelm reporters in the run-up to Election Day. We reached out to two polling experts to help guide journalists in navigating the numbers. Alan I. Abramowitz is the Alben W. Barkley Professor of Political Science at Emory University and Courtney Kennedy is the director of survey research at…


October 20, 2020
‘This one is going to be big’: How bar chart race animation tells the story of COVID & partisanship

One of the country’s go-to COVID resources comes not from the Centers for Disease Control, but from a web developer based in Schenectady, New York. As COVID cases surged across the U.S. this summer, Dan Goodspeed found a unique way to visualize the numbers state-by-state over time. Using raw data from The New York Times,…


October 19, 2020
The 10 truths about planning

Planning and long-term thinking doesn’t come naturally to everyone. There are people who love lists and others who thrive on serendipity. Newsrooms are often influenced by the preferences of their leaders, for better or worse.  Here’s a warning: If you’re a manager who likes to make decisions on the fly and feels constricted by calendars,…


October 16, 2020
‘What day is it?’: How The Washington Post plans to help you reclaim time

Like many of his readers, Washington Post audience editor Steven Johnson started feeling a “warped sense of time” as the pandemic ensued.  To regain a sense of stability and routine, he launched a newsletter called “What Day Is It?” that examines how the perception of time affects mental health. This 7-day email series offers to…


October 15, 2020
‘Journalists have always been harassed’: How JSafe can help fight back

As journalist and educator Kat Duncan spoke with other female journalists about resources for reporting online harassment, she saw a critical need. “I wanted to create something that could help journalists document and deal with these incidents,” she said.  The idea led Duncan — the interim director of innovation for the Innovation & Futures Lab…


October 14, 2020
‘No secrets here’: Why Reason journalists reveal how they’ll vote

Since 2004, staffers at Reason have done what others in journalism typically don’t: They publicly announce who they plan to vote for in the presidential election. As in similar years, this year’s survey shows a preference for the Libertarian party. We asked Reason’s editor in chief Katherine Mangu-Ward about the history and response to the…


October 13, 2020
Great leaders close the loop

Here’s a quick way to raise your credibility as a manager: learn to “close the loop.” Closing the loop means providing answers to requests or inquiries as quickly as possible, especially when they are communicated to you by email, text or chat. When you’re known for closing the loop, you don’t leave people to wonder…


October 9, 2020
‘Representation is so important’: IndyStar’s first Spanish-language newsletter, one month in

Indianapolis Star reporter Natalia Contreras and her editor Daniela Franco Brown began translating and editing stories in Spanish earlier this year as a way to serve the growing Spanish-speaking population in Central Indiana. This initiative led to the launch of La Estrella — IndyStar’s first newsletter in Spanish.  We reached out to Contreras by email…


October 8, 2020
‘Media reparations could create a future of journalism’: How Media 2070 seeks to transform news

After a long history of anti-Black racism in journalism, what would reparations look like? That’s what the founders of Media 2070 decided to explore, seeing that 50 years after the Kerner Commission report, not much has changed.  Media 2070, which includes a research essay compiled by staff from the nonprofit Free Press,  launched this week….


October 7, 2020
Why the Boston Globe endorsed 12 ways for 12 voter types

The Boston Globe endorsed Joe Biden for president. But unlike previous years, the editorial board made 12 cases for 12 different types of voters in an interactive project that ran with its traditional editorial. We reached out to Bina Venkataraman, editorial page editor at the Boston Globe, to learn how they produced the project and…


October 5, 2020
Could I have a word with you about your manager?

This is a message to everyone who has a manager.  First, let me start by thanking you for all you are doing for journalism in this moment.  And let’s not kid ourselves. It isn’t a moment. It’s more of an epoch, defined by a relentless confluence of critical stories that are at once inspiring and…


October 1, 2020
‘Question everything’: 3 tips for covering health when you usually don’t

When reporting on the evolving pandemic, skepticism is crucial, says Apoorva Mandavilli, a science and global health reporter at The New York Times. Official guidance and scientific consensus will inevitably shift, challenging journalists to provide new context and transparency in their coverage.   We reached out to Mandavilli to learn how journalists can cover unfolding pandemic…


September 29, 2020
Engaging student voters: One Vote NC delivers election coverage statewide

With early voting set to begin in the swing state of North Carolina on October 15, college newspaper collaborative One Vote NC has launched an online voter guide and election newsletter to help inform student voters across the state. We followed up with Sonia Rao, The Daily Tar Heel’s city & state editor, to find…


September 29, 2020
How newsroom leaders are reinventing praise and celebrations (remotely)

How many times can you say “thank you” or “good work” during Zoom calls with your staff before these two terms become stale and meaningless? That’s a question in the minds of many leaders already facing enormous challenges in leading their newsrooms during a COVID-19 pandemic, a reinvigorated social rights movement, and the most acute…


September 28, 2020
How journalists can report on health policy when it’s not usually their job

Great health reporting demonstrates the human implications of major policy changes, said Shefali Luthra of The 19th*.  Luthra — who joined the team in July — covers the intersection of women and health care. She previously reported on national health care and policy as a correspondent for Kaiser Health News.  We reached out to Luthra…


September 25, 2020
My brother Austin Tice asked me to go to Syria with him. Four months later, he was taken.

I was at the beach with my family when my brother Austin called. His schedule at Georgetown Law School had prevented him from joining us. I slipped into an empty room at the little house we were renting and listened, astonished, as he told me he was planning a trip to Syria that summer of…


September 23, 2020
‘Journalists are not the enemy’: Investigative reporter Julie K. Brown named to TIME 100 list

TIME has named investigative journalist Julie K. Brown one of its 100 Most Influential People of 2020, the magazine announced today.  Brown — whose “explosive reporting” on the late Jeffrey Epstein prompted a legal re-examination of the financier’s predatory behavior — was also the 2019 recipient of the Journalism Institute’s Neil and Susan Sheehan Award…


September 23, 2020
Leaders use the power of intentionality

It’s easy to set goals. It’s harder to make commitments. When you do the latter, it’s a promise, not a hope. To keep your promises, you must be intentional. And that’s powerful. Here’s what intentionality looks like in action. When you’re intentional about providing feedback, you’re vigilant about including it into your daily interactions with…


September 22, 2020
‘Write tight’: 3 tips for pitching, from an editor at The Atlantic

So you have a story idea but it needs a home. How do you stand out with an editor who sees countless pitches every day? We reached out to Prashant Rao, international editor at The Atlantic, for his advice on ways journalists can refine their pitches.  Rao has worked with journalists around the world; before…


September 18, 2020
‘We saw an important need’: SPJ launches Race & Gender Hotline for journalists

To offer nuanced answers on race and gender issues, the Society of Professional Journalists has partnered with the Trans Journalists Association and other leading Black and LGBT journalists to launch a confidential hotline for reporters to ask questions without judgement. From properly identifying sources to insensitive phrases or photos, journalists can submit questions online and…


September 17, 2020
‘Let the storm come to you’: Weather Channel reporter shares tips for natural disaster coverage

For Emmy award-winning weather reporter Tevin Wooten and his team at The Weather Channel, coverage this year has changed in “every way one could imagine.”  The pandemic complicated travel plans and resources. And hurricanes and wildfires intensified.  Sally — the fourth hurricane to make landfall in the U.S. this year — has inundated the Gulf…


September 14, 2020
‘Public service journalism’: What education reporting looks like now in a college town

Education reporting has been an “all-hands-on-deck” situation at the Centre Daily Times during the pandemic, says executive editor Jessica McAllister.  The newspaper — located in State College, Pennsylvania — is the hometown media outlet for Pennsylvania State University. Since students returned to campus on Aug. 24, McAllister and her team have reported on the rising…


September 14, 2020
‘Watching people succeed’: What brings managers joy

Advice from Jill Geisler, Bill Plante Chair in Leadership & Media Integrity, Loyola University Chicago and Freedom Forum Fellow in Women’s Leadership One of the first things newly promoted managers realize is how little control they have of their time. They’re managing up, down and sideways, and all of those connections (bosses, staff and management…


September 11, 2020
Remembering 9/11, from the front page

Today marks the 19th anniversary of the September 11 attacks. In 2001, the front page of the newspaper remained one of the boldest statements in news.  10 years later, the way we got news started to shift from television and newspapers to the Internet.  In 2020, the coverage of major news events like the coronavirus…


September 11, 2020
‘It’s about them winning, not you’: What brings managers joy

Advice from Jill Geisler, Bill Plante Chair in Leadership & Media Integrity, Loyola University Chicago and Freedom Forum Fellow in Women’s Leadership To be a manager is to be entrusted with power. How you use it can define both your success and your happiness. That’s the clear message in the responses I received when I…


September 10, 2020
What brings managers joy: ‘Run through walls’

Advice from Jill Geisler, Bill Plante Chair in Leadership & Media Integrity, Loyola University Chicago and Freedom Forum Fellow in Women’s Leadership People are usually promoted to management because they’ve done well at their frontline jobs. But what made them good reporters, photographers or producers doesn’t necessarily make them good managers. It takes a whole…


September 10, 2020
Institute honors The Atlantic’s Ed Yong with the Sheehan award for investigative journalism

Ed Yong, the staff writer at The Atlantic who has been shaping our collective understanding of the coronavirus and its impact, will receive the National Press Club Journalism Institute’s 2020 Neil and Susan Sheehan award for investigative journalism. Yong’s in-depth analytical writing has explained, week after week, everything from the mask debate to long-haulers to…


September 9, 2020
‘A whole new experience’: How to get the most out of virtual conferences

Attending a virtual conference for the first time this fall? The Journalism Institute reached out to five journalists to learn their strategies for maximizing remote event experiences. Rebecca Aguilar is Secretary Treasurer and Diversity Committee Chair for the Society of Professional Journalists. She created a video on how to build your network during a virtual…


September 9, 2020
‘Provoke ideas and let them run’: What motivates managers

Advice from Jill Geisler, Bill Plante Chair in Leadership & Media Integrity, Loyola University Chicago and Freedom Forum Fellow in Women’s Leadership In the best case scenario, we succeed at work because of, not in spite of, our managers. The best supervisors see their jobs as far more than hitting targets and making rules. Their…


September 8, 2020
Remember the small comforts that make you smile

Step away from the news cycle and take a few minutes to remember the small things that bring you joy throughout the day. Is it enjoying a cup of coffee or tea as the sun rises? Is it taking a stroll around the neighborhood with your canine companion? Is it silent meditation in between Zoom…


September 8, 2020
What makes managers happy: ‘I love seeing employees grow’

Advice from Jill Geisler,Bill Plante Chair in Leadership & Media Integrity, Loyola University ChicagoFreedom Forum Fellow in Women’s Leadership Over the Labor Day weekend, I asked my friends on social media a simple question: Managers, what brings you happiness at work? Their responses weren’t about power, pay or prestige. The message they surfaced repeatedly was about…


September 4, 2020
12 tips to revitalize your self-care routine

This Labor Day weekend get a jump on the fall season by prioritizing your well-being. Here are 12 ways to relieve stress, have fun and rethink self-care. Stiff? Stretching can help you relax and ease any soreness from sitting too long. Get moving. We all know the benefits of exercise. This weekend is a perfect…


September 4, 2020
13 journalists on what keeps them writing

During the pandemic we’ve heard from several great writers about how they are writing through the pandemic. Here are their top tips: Let your experience guide the narrative Sarah Maslin Nir, staff reporter at The New York Times: Living the experience is the key, right? … This is sort of the ultimate shoe leather. Elizabeth…


September 2, 2020
3 tips for newsroom training programs from Dow Jones News Fund managing director

In her 32 years as managing director of the Dow Jones News Fund, Linda Shockley has received numerous honors and helped countless student journalists advance their careers in news.  This summer, the Fund secured virtual internships for nearly all its 78 interns, despite the pandemic.  As Shockley nears retirement next month, the Institute reached out…


September 2, 2020
Dance your stress away

Two left feet? Sure, you could release some stress at the end of the day watching the latest season of “Dancing With The Stars.” But why not take center stage in your own living room?  Studies show that dancing lowers stress and can boost happiness. Mentally focusing on dance moves and the physical activity itself…


September 2, 2020
Starting a new chapter? That’s a good thing.

Reading is a proven stress reducer, but our day-to-day “required” reading might be causing more pain than pleasure.  It may seem counterintuitive for journalists to put down the paper, turn off social media or ignore email — all required reading to get the job done (or get ahead). But escaping into other forms of reading…


September 1, 2020
Be careful who you tweet: The story behind a Portland newsroom’s viral response

When Portland Press Herald social media editor Josh Linehan saw yet another tweet confusing Portland, Oregon with Portland, Maine he saw an opportunity for the Press Herald’s Twitter account.  The question: “Can you help me understand the Portland riots. Why haven’t you stopped the violence?”  Linehan stated the obvious: “Well, we’re a newspaper in Maine…


September 1, 2020
Plan your holiday vacation now, even if you’re not traveling

The holiday season is months off, but if we’ve learned anything during the pandemic, it’s this: Time flies. Don’t leave your earned vacation time on the table.  Taking time away from work can help you avoid burnout, and decompression time doesn’t have to involve a destination. But employees across the country have been stockpiling vacation…


August 31, 2020
3 tips on writing about grief from NPR’s TV critic

This weekend, the world mourned the death of actor Chadwick Boseman. On Sunday evening, 6.1 million viewers honored Boseman by tuning in to watch his leading performance as King T’Challa in “Black Panther” on ABC in an act of collective grief.  NPR’s TV critic Eric Deggans eulogized Boseman on Twitter: “After talking about Chadwick Boseman’s…


August 31, 2020
Are you a great middle manager?

They’re called mid-level managers, but they are so much more. On any given day, they are: The translators of upper level management’s messages The first line of feedback to employees who crave it The wizards of workarounds when plans or tools fail The mediators of conflicts The protectors of quality The hiring scouts The supply…


August 31, 2020
Some vitamins and minerals reduce stress. Should you try them?

Stress takes physical forms in our lives daily: restless sleep, stress-related hair loss, headaches, digestive issues and more.  While there’s no magic pill to stop stress in its tracks, adjusting your vitamin and supplement regimen (or starting one) may help address anxiety from the inside out through nutrition.  Keep in mind:  Vitamins aren’t regulated by…


August 28, 2020
2020 is the year of figuring it out on the fly

I think I’m like most journalists: bad at self-care. We’ve been talking about it a lot this week, trying to brainstorm solutions, because across newsrooms everyone has hit a wall. I’ve noticed an extra day off or two really isn’t helping much because the first day back it’s like you never left. Work seems inescapable…


August 27, 2020
Reframe your goals with COVID contract

We know that writing down goals dramatically increases the likelihood you’ll achieve them.  So why haven’t we written out our No. 1 shared goal during this pandemic: How we’ll survive?  This week, certified professional coach Mary Ellen Ball wrote about self-care: “If one more person uses that airplane metaphor, telling me to put on my…


August 27, 2020
Hurricane Journalism: How Gulf Coast newsrooms are handling Marco & Laura (and a pandemic)

As Marco and Laura approached the Gulf Coast this week, local reporters prepared for a crisis within a crisis. While Marco weakened to a tropical depression on Monday, Laura strengthened into a Category 4 storm, making landfall early Thursday morning. Against the backdrop of COVID-19, evacuation orders impacted more than 1 million residents in Texas…


August 26, 2020
Is your WFH tech still working for you?

It’s time to face reality: Many of us won’t see the inside of our offices any time soon. Is the at-home work space you carved out five months ago still cutting it?  As students return to virtual classrooms this week (and need their own space), it’s a good time to take stock of your household’s…


August 25, 2020
3 tips for resiliency in journalism

Resilience. It’s a quality familiar to many journalists. The ability to process hardship — whether personal, professional or both — and rebound stronger.  But sometimes even the most resilient can struggle, especially right now.  Here are three ways journalists can strengthen resilience on the job. 1. Write everything down. During a Journalism Institute conversation about…


August 25, 2020
This quiz could tip you to a productivity system

If you’re feeling less productive these days, you aren’t alone. Your tried-and-true system to get things done at work or at home (which mingle today more than ever) may be challenged in new ways: procrastination, changes in priorities, and ability to focus among them.  Routines, especially during chaotic times, help us feel a sense of…


August 24, 2020
How to avoid using ‘officer-involved shooting’

The news release from the Kenosha (Wisconsin) Police Department on Sunday night said, “At 5:11 p.m., Kenosha Police Officers … were involved in an officer involved shooting.” Video released later that night by a lawyer for the family of Jacob Blake, a Black man, shows Kenosha police shooting at Blake several times. As newsrooms reckon with…


August 24, 2020
Bingo! Make your walk a double win

A change of scenery can spark creativity (and boost your energy), and you know that spending time outdoors is good for your health. If your neighborhood stroll has become a chore, adding a bingo game could help add some allure.  Points for pups: The Washington Post’s interactive dog-themed game features squares for fur-friends donning bandannas…


August 24, 2020
To be an ally, you can’t just hold others to account

Trust is the glue that binds relationships. It’s an essential component of leadership. It’s the fuel that drives high-performing teams.  Trust is confidence, in the face of risk, that the other person will do the right thing.  Trust is also essential to earning the title of “ally,” because an ally is a trusted force for…


August 21, 2020
Watch the world around you

I sit under the pergola on our patio and watch birds in the feeders and the shallow pond on our place in the limestone hills of Texas. We have dozens of Northern Cardinals, Carolina Chickadees, Tufted Titmouse, Painted Buntings and even endangered Golden-Cheeked Warblers. And, of course, hummingbirds this time of year. These creatures continue…


August 20, 2020
How local beat reporting led to the ‘tipping point’ US Postal Service story

How does a journalist know when a story is going to be big? For Washington Post staff writer Erin Cox that moment came after some public records appeared in her email as she prepared dinner one evening with her husband. But it started on August 5 while she was covering a Maryland Board of Elections…


August 20, 2020
Tapped-out creatively? Tips for sparking ideas

Well, first of all, if you’re feeling tapped out — that’s OK. We’re all overcome with cases of the blahs. A big part of that is caused by COVID-19, and, unfortunately, that’s not going away soon enough. But the ubiquitous Zoom that we’ve all been using for work meetings can be a powerful tool, if…


August 20, 2020
A voice or a vote? Great leaders help teams exercise influence

I’ve heard the word “vote” so many times these days that it made me think of how that word plays out in the workplace. Employees understand that workplaces are not necessarily democracies. People in management are empowered and obligated to make decisions. They involve strategy, personnel, policies, partnerships and budgets. Managers are expected to spend…


August 19, 2020
The Mail delivers a new beat: The US Postal Service

Until this month, the United States Postal Service didn’t make many headlines. Now, Motherboard senior writer Aaron Gordon devotes an entire beat to the mail.  Gordon started covering the USPS after learning last year that mail trucks were catching on fire. His reporting eventually sparked an idea to launch The Mail, a weekly newsletter focusing…


August 19, 2020
Don’t fall behind, prepare for change in coming months

Whatever your new normal has become, one thing is certain: It’s bound to change as fall approaches.  Working parents will juggle a host of different challenges at home as students return to the classroom (virtually or in-person). As the weather changes, so will outdoor workout routines or time with your furry friends. And with the…


August 18, 2020
Diversity leaders at NPR, Dallas Morning News, Washington Post describe the changes ahead

America’s newsrooms don’t look like America. And it shows in their coverage. News organizations are whiter and more male than the overall U.S. workforce. Many communities feel journalists don’t understand them. And journalists struggle to engage with underrepresented communities. In the aftermath of the killing of George Floyd and the social justice protests that ensued,…


August 18, 2020
Brain fog? Learn a new language

“Dónde está mi cabeza?” If you’ve been wondering where your head is — or experiencing brain mush when you need mental clarity — voici une solution: Try picking up a new language.  Studies show that learning a new language is a beneficial addition to self-care routines. Formal or informal lessons can provide structure important to…


August 18, 2020
Self-care tips for journalists

Self-care is as much about learning as it is about practicing. Help our journalism community by sharing how you are getting through this challenging time. Here are our best strategies for taking care of yourselves during the coronavirus outbreak. Mute, pause, delete: Edit notifications to gain emotional control The siren call of notifications cry for…


August 17, 2020
That ‘clusterf–k’ headline: How UNC’s newspaper responded to a COVID ‘cluster’ on campus

Editors at UNC-Chapel Hill’s The Daily Tar Heel responded to multiple COVID-19 clusters on campus with an unprecedented editorial. The headline: UNC has a clusterfuck on its hands. We emailed Anna Pogarcic, editor-in-chief of The DTH, to find out the story behind the unforgettable headline. Since in-person classes began on August 10, coronavirus cases appeared…


August 17, 2020
Ode to a leader’s love

To download this poem, click here. Advice from Jill Geisler, Bill Plante Chair in Leadership & Media Integrity, Loyola University Chicago and Freedom Forum Fellow in Women’s Leadership Click here to read Jill’s previous posts. Click here to subscribe to our daily newsletter, including Jill’s advice.


August 14, 2020
Graphic designer, editor give away fully designed pages

Seeing your work in print never gets old. For graphic designer Charles Apple, he’s getting that thrill several editions over.  For four months, he’s shared his full-page Further Review designs at no cost to any news organization that asks. In all, about 30 have published them, including Apple’s hometown paper.   “It was a matter of…


August 13, 2020
3 tips for covering faith when you usually don’t

Religion can touch just about any story — from coronavirus to the presidential election. But  few newsrooms today have a full-time religion reporter. The Institute reached out to Elizabeth Dias, the national religion correspondent at The New York Times, for advice on how journalists can cover stories intersecting with faith.  What are your strategies for…


August 13, 2020
To fight systemic inequity, look up

To fight systemic inequity in organizations, it’s not enough to look at front line managers. Look up. Scrutinize the marching orders they get from the very top — from their organization’s boards, strategists, consultants and budgeters.  Frontline managers aren’t given mandates that overtly say “discriminate, pay unfairly, limit opportunities for staff growth, or under-serve certain…


August 11, 2020
‘One to watch’: Sen. Kamala Harris’ earliest national media appearances

As presumptive Democractic presidential nominee Joe Biden was choosing his running mate, many commentators warned about sexist and racist coverage of his eventual pick for Vice President. Now that he has chosen Sen. Kamala Harris, we thought it would be interesting to look back at some of her first appearances in national media, based on…


August 10, 2020
7 student newsrooms, 1 goal: One Vote NC seeks to educate, motivate voters

Anna Pogarcic, editor-in-chief of The Daily Tar Heel, knew something wasn’t quite right with the paper’s previous election coverage: It was out of touch with the community.  Inspired by Jay Rosen’s Citizens Agenda, her newsroom partnered with other student publications in North Carolina to understand what students wanted to know about the 2020 election. The…


August 10, 2020
Working ‘in the trenches’ during a pandemic

In the trenches. That’s where some of our best work relationships were formed. On field assignments where we got to know each other’s beliefs, strengths and quirks. On big events and breaking news where our focus and purpose led to teamwork, not turf protection. On overnight or weekend shifts where our smaller crews were more…


August 7, 2020
Journalists have grit, even during a pandemic. What about their children?

For journalists who are parents, the stress may be about to get worse. Will schools open? Will children — again — have to learn remotely? Will the four walls of their house or apartment once again feel like they are closing in? Journalists can be a resilient breed. They run to danger when others flee….


August 6, 2020
‘I needed to photograph to stay sane’: US journalist recounts Beirut explosion

Daniel Carde and his girlfriend had just cut some basil from the balcony garden and gone to the kitchen to prepare dinner on Tuesday. Then the building started shaking.  “We first thought it was an earthquake, but then the building shook harder,” said Carde, an American freelance photographer who has worked out of Beirut, Lebanon,…


August 6, 2020
Introducing the Class of 2020: Brittany Pichler

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students who graduated from college or Master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market. We hope they’ll meet future bosses and colleagues here, who will reach out and support them in building journalism’s future together.  Name: Brittany Pichler School: Texas A&M…


August 4, 2020
Introducing the Class of 2020: Allyson Nichols

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students who graduated from college or Master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market. We hope they’ll meet future bosses and colleagues here, who will reach out and support them in building journalism’s future together.  Name: Allyson Nichols School: Kent State…


August 3, 2020
‘Stereotypes need to be shattered’; How j-schools can help diversify newsrooms

As newsrooms continue to grapple with racial inequities, we emailed journalism schools to determine how academia is addressing the same issues, and what lessons journalists can learn from them.  News organizations cannot wait for people to come to them, said Tracy Everbach, Ph.D., professor at University of North Texas’ Mayborn School of Journalism. They “need…


August 3, 2020
Leaders, it’s time for a remote work check

It seems ages ago that journalists moved their work stations from newsrooms to living rooms. Organizations moved quickly to protect their teams during the pandemic and resilient employees adapted.  They made it work.  Good managers keep tabs on their staff’s well-being and the effectiveness of the workflow, so it’s important to keep asking, “Can it…


July 30, 2020
Capitalizing W is not a Black and White decision

The Washington Post this week adopted the Associated Press’ decision to capitalize Black as a racial identifier, with a twist. It also will capitalize White — a change the AP and other news organizations have declined to embrace. “In American history, many White Europeans who entered the country during times of mass migration were the…


July 30, 2020
Former CIA analyst shares ‘fake news’ tips for journalists

Fake news isn’t new. But the Internet provides a unique environment for misinformation that it just might take a former government intelligence officer to understand. In the new book TRUE OR FALSE, former CIA analyst and disinformation expert Cindy Otis dissects the long history of fake news. She offers strategies she learned during her tenure…


July 30, 2020
Introducing the Class of 2020: Kane Mitten

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students who graduated from college or Master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market. We hope they’ll meet future bosses and colleagues here, who will reach out and support them in building journalism’s future together.  Name: Kane Mitten School: Northern Kentucky…


July 28, 2020
For MLB writers, ‘our focus right now is getting through 60 games with our health intact’

To a sports writer, covering Major League Baseball during a pandemic-shortened season means fewer journalistic scoops, less access to players, and the fear that baseball writers roaming a clubhouse in search of stories may be a thing of the past. Paul Sullivan, the president of the Baseball Writers Association of America and an award-winning veteran…


July 28, 2020
Introducing the Class of 2020: Vandana Ravikumar

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students who graduated from college or Master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market. We hope they’ll meet future bosses and colleagues here, who will reach out and support them in building journalism’s future together.  Name: Vandana Ravikumar School: Arizona State…


July 27, 2020
The government’s PR barrier: When access to experts is limited or banned

When Secretary of Defense Mark Esper issued a memo that requires all contacts with news reporters to be coordinated through the Pentagon’s public affairs office, he highlighted a widespread practice that journalism advocates say restricts information, creates political “spin” and gags policy experts. The Pentagon is not the only federal department operating under such limitations….


July 27, 2020
Are you an “I’ or a “We” Manager? When and why?

Here’s a quick leadership check for managers: Find the last five memos you sent to your staff.  Read them over, circling the pronouns “I” and “we.” Look at the proportion of “I”s to “we”s. Look at the context in which you chose to use “I” and “we.” At first glance, this exercise is an ego…


July 24, 2020
Introducing the Class of 2020: Brenton Blanchet

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students who graduated from college or Master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market. We hope they’ll meet future bosses and colleagues here, who will reach out and support them in building journalism’s future together.  Name: Brenton Blanchet School: University at BuffaloLocation:…


July 23, 2020
How the Miami Herald is turning COVID-19 readers into loyal subscribers

News consumption spiked as the pandemic hit the United States, but audiences have since fluctuated, their attention span tested by the incessant virus and the eruption of protests following the killing of George Floyd. Amid all that, news organizations have worked to expand and retain their readers, viewers and website visitors.  “A big challenge is…


July 22, 2020
Post follows a burger from cow to customer: ‘I think about this story almost every time I eat’

Washington Post enterprise reporter Jessica Contrera knows how to follow her senses to find powerful details that immerse readers in a story. Still, tracking a hamburger from steer seed to mouth-watering plate presented new challenges. We interviewed Jessica and her editor, Lynda Robinson, about how she and the Post team overcame those challenges in, “From…


July 22, 2020
Introducing the Class of 2020: Sarah Hayner

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students who graduated from college or Master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market. We hope they’ll meet future bosses and colleagues here, who will reach out and support them in building journalism’s future together.  Name: Sarah Hayner  School: Tarleton State University Location:…


July 21, 2020
Ann Arbor’s only daily newspaper is run by students, covering an endlessly ‘crazy news cycle’

When the coronavirus, an economic downturn, and the aftermath of George Floyd’s killing came to Ann Arbor, the only daily newspaper to capture its local impact was run by students at The University of Michigan, which has no journalism school. Last October, seemingly a lifetime of news cycles ago, The New York Times featured The…


July 20, 2020
Terry Gross and Michael Barbaro share interview tips and techniques

A good interviewer prepares well, never forgets to ask “why,” and carefully listens — for tone, for key words or phrases, for follow-up questions.  Those were among the takeaways from a conversation between Terry Gross, host and executive producer of NPR’s Fresh Air, and Michael Barbaro, host of The New York Times’ podcast The Daily….


July 20, 2020
We need connections, not just transactions

I’ve lived the last few months on Zoom, Teams, Meet, Skype, Webex, GotoMeeting, and Whereby.  I’ve communicated with people who were mimes until they remembered to unmute,  with lighting ideal for witnesses in need of protection, and with camera angles that created nostril-oscopys. I’ve slogged through connectivity glitches, calendar conflicts and time-zone confusion. Still, remote…


July 20, 2020
Introducing the Class of 2020: Abigail Sliva

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students who graduated from college or Master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market. We hope they’ll meet future bosses and colleagues here, who will reach out and support them in building journalism’s future together. Name: Abigail Sliva School: University of St….


July 17, 2020
“A wild, wild West”: How NYT makes sense of COVID-19 reporting systems

The Trump administration this week ordered hospitals to send their coronavirus data to the Department of Health and Human Services, bypassing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Thursday morning, the CDC website that had been displaying the data was blank, prompting an outcry from journalists and members of Congress. Later Thursday, the CDC restored…


July 17, 2020
Introducing the Class of 2020: Shabnam Danesh

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students who graduated from college or Master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market. We hope they’ll meet future bosses and colleagues here, who will reach out and support them in building journalism’s future together.  Name: Shabnam Danesh School: American University…


July 16, 2020
Journalists: It’s time to really start using LinkedIn

Are you using LinkedIn to your professional advantage? Career experts weigh in on standing out online in a competitive job market. Suzanne Alcantara, assistant dean of Student Affairs at USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism: LinkedIn is a very powerful part of your job-searching toolkit, and everyone should be using it. Make sure your…


July 15, 2020
‘We are seeking a higher standard’: J-schools can improve newsroom diversity

Issues spurring recent changes and pushbacks in journalism aren’t new, said Julian Rodriguez, a broadcast professor at the University of Texas at Arlington. They’ve simply become “more prominent because of how we perceive and understand inequality today.” “We have today’s newsroom heated discussions not necessarily because journalism is in decline but because we are seeking…


July 15, 2020
Introducing the Class of 2020: Brady Vernon

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students who graduated from college or Master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market. We hope they’ll meet future bosses and colleagues here, who will reach out and support them in building journalism’s future together.  Name: Brady Vernon  School: Arizona State…


July 14, 2020
At 400,000 pages and growing, a database of COVID-19 documents bursts with local stories

Armed with confidential data, The Kansas City Star last month identified causes and locations of coronavirus outbreaks that state officials had kept under wraps — from the Tyson meatpacking plant near Garden City, Kan., to the keg party west of Topeka. The document came from a trove of records that Columbia University’s Brown Institute for…


July 13, 2020
Institute announces programs with Terry Gross, Abby Phillip, Sewell Chan, Nikole Hannah-Jones, Michael Barbaro and more

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is offering new upcoming programs as part of its ongoing series of community conversations: The art & craft of the interview: How to deeply listen (July 17, 4 pm to 4:45 pm EDT). Do you listen, or do you wait to ask? Join two of the best interviewers in…


July 13, 2020
Introducing the Class of 2020: Kortni (Wells) Gardner

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students who graduated from college or Master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market. We hope they’ll meet future bosses and colleagues here, who will reach out and support them in building journalism’s future together.  Name: Kortni (Wells) Gardner  School: Utah…


July 13, 2020
Leaders, are you easy to manage?

“Managing the boss” is a session I often teach in leadership workshops. Knowing how to interact with your manager to get the best results for your ideas, projects, and career is an essential skill. Some bosses are easier to manage than others. They tend to be more open about their decision-making process, their goals, and…


July 10, 2020
Introducing the Class of 2020: Zack Demars

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students who graduated from college or Master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market. We hope they’ll meet future bosses and colleagues here, who will reach out and support them in building journalism’s future together.  Name: Zack Demars School: University of…


July 9, 2020
Stuck on style? Diversity Style Guide aims to be inclusive, evolving resource

Language changes constantly. So should how journalists use it.  “It’s our responsibility as journalists to listen to our sources and audiences and pay close attention to the subtleties and nuances of our language as it evolves,” says Rachele Kanigel, editor of The Diversity Style Guide.  As newsrooms work to ensure social justice pervades all beats…


July 8, 2020
Introducing the Class of 2020: Stephanie Bates with advice from ESPN’s Tom Rinaldi

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students who graduated from college or Master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market. We hope they’ll meet future bosses and colleagues here, who will reach out and support them in building journalism’s future together.  Name: Stephanie Bates School: Arizona State…


July 8, 2020
‘Come in curious and empathetic’: A Rolling Stone reporter asked journalists to share the best reporting advice — and hundreds did

“Journalists: what is the best reporting advice you’ve gotten during your career?” Seeing a need for greater guidance to emerging journalists, Rolling Stone culture reporter EJ Dickson posed that question on Twitter and within 24 hours, the thread was shared more than 1,000 times. We asked her by email about the idea for the thread,…


July 7, 2020
‘The model has completely changed’: Reporting under NFL COVID-19 protocols

The NFL has shared its COVID-19 protocols for the 2020 training camp and preseason. And it looks dramatically different from previous years. “Training camp for reporters is such a valuable time — both for beat writers and national writers who ordinarily travel to different camps and get to speak with players and coaches from a…


July 6, 2020
Job hunting? Advice for mid-career journalists

Mid-career professionals looking for journalism jobs during the pandemic should take heart, career experts said. Is it a challenging market? Yes. But prepared, adaptable, creative applicants will stand out.  Be prepared. Start by updating your online portfolio or resume. Then take some time to reflect on what you really want. “Now is the time to…


July 6, 2020
Introducing the Class of 2020: Jishnu Nair

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students who graduated from college or Master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market. We hope they’ll meet future bosses and colleagues here, who will reach out and support them in building journalism’s future together.  Name: Jishnu Nair School: Syracuse University…


July 2, 2020
Newsroom leaders, here’s what future staffers want you to know about diversity

The pandemic, economic struggles and the most recent demands for social justice are forcing newsrooms to account for their own failures at diversity, inclusion and representative coverage. The work of sustaining change will fall on the incoming generation of journalists. As the National Press Club Journalism Institute spotlights recent graduates ready to pursue careers in…


July 2, 2020
‘There’s always more that can be done’: How J-schools can help newsrooms with diversity

There is a “reckoning moment” happening in the industry today. As newsrooms work to address racial inequities within, we reached out to journalism schools to learn how academia can help. “There is no pipeline problem,” said Robert Hernandez, USC Annenberg School of Journalism associate professor of professional practice, last week. “J-schools across the country have…


July 2, 2020
One small, smart message for work-from-home parents

It’s a great video. Dr. Clare Wenham, a professor in Global Health Policy at London School of Economics and Political Science, is being interviewed about COVID-19 data by Christian Fraser on the BBC. Like many parents working from home these days, she’s not alone. Her young daughter makes an appearance. She wants to discuss her…


July 1, 2020
Stand out on screen: How to nail a virtual job interview

So you’ve built your professional network and landed a virtual job interview. Now what? We reached out to journalism schools for their advice on how interviewees at any stage in their careers can shine remotely. Treat video job interviews the same as you would in person. “You still have to be prepared, research the company…


July 1, 2020
Introducing the Class of 2020: Claire Bugos

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students who graduated from college or Master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market. We hope they’ll meet future bosses and colleagues here, who will reach out and support them in building journalism’s future together.  Name: Claire Bugos School: Northwestern University…


July 1, 2020
‘We were the source of their suffering’: How one newsroom lets stories be forgotten

When community leaders appealed to The Philadelphia Inquirer last week to change how it covered the city’s diverse population, they proposed an advisory board to help develop crime coverage policies, including ways for people named in crime stories to have the stories removed from the Inquirer website.’ The idea — often called the right to…


June 30, 2020
Trans Journalists Association launches to fill gap

The journalism world is pretty small. For journalists who identify as trans, that world felt even smaller — until this week.  The Trans Journalists Association launched Tuesday. Ashley Dejean helped start the group after seeking out other trans journalists — and coming up short for a centralized group. They started a Facebook group that evolved…


June 29, 2020
Introducing the Class of 2020: Addison Kliewer

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students who graduated from college or Master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market. We hope they’ll meet future bosses and colleagues here, who will reach out and support them in building journalism’s future together.  Name: Addison Kliewer School: University of…


June 29, 2020
Newsroom change must be systemic, not symbolic

The state of Mississippi voted Sunday to replace its state flag, the last in the U.S. to feature the Confederate battle emblem.  Errin Haines, editor-at-large for The 19th whose journalism has focused on the intersection of race, ethnicity, politics and culture, tweeted a response:  “Dismantling systemic racism does not happen in one day or with…


June 29, 2020
This Missouri j-school grad changed the NFL

Bryndon Minter changed NFL history when he went rogue earlier this month to produce an anti-racism video with the League’s leading players. That video prompted commissioner Roger Goodell to say the words players had been waiting years to hear: Black lives matter. Minter’s history of going rogue started much earlier, though, when he was an…


June 26, 2020
Journalistic transparency: A TV station explains its decisions to the public

A year ago, Cleveland’s ABC affiliate Channel 5 pulled back the curtain on its decision-making to tell online readers why it did not run mugshot galleries and stories inspired by mugshots. That peek into newsroom thinking would become an ongoing series. Led by Digital Director Joe Donatelli, the station offers chatty, candid, blunt insider details…


June 26, 2020
Introducing the Class of 2020: Nicola Wenz

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students who graduated from college or Master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market. We hope they’ll meet future bosses and colleagues here, who will reach out and support them in building journalism’s future together.  Name: Nicola Wenz School: University of…


June 25, 2020
Inspiration for journalists: Prize thoughtfulness; ignore easy answers; be humble

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students graduating from college or master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market.  As part of this series, we ask accomplished journalists for their advice. Ed Yong, staff writer for The Atlantic, provided guidance that applies to both new and seasoned reporters alike.


June 25, 2020
How to be there for your furloughed or laid off colleague

Financial straits at U.S. newspapers continue to take their toll on jobs. It’s hard to know what to do — or say — when a furlough or layoff affects people you care about (yourself included).  In the last two weeks alone, Hawaii’s largest daily newspaper, the Honolulu Star-Advertiser, said it will cut 29 newsroom positions…


June 25, 2020
Leaders protect their teams: Mask up

The country recorded its highest single-day total of coronavirus cases this week. Journalists know that. They’re on the front lines, covering the pandemic. Wearing masks. Even when people they’re reporting on are not. At the same time, an army of fact-checkers — Politifact, Factcheck.org, USA Today, Snopes — has had to knock down falsehoods about…


June 24, 2020
Introducing the Class of 2020: Molly Stellino with advice from The Atlantic’s Ed Yong

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students who graduated from college or Master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market. We hope they’ll meet future bosses and colleagues here, who will reach out and support them in building journalism’s future together.  Name: Molly Stellino School: Arizona State…


June 23, 2020
‘There is no pipeline problem’: Robert Hernandez on newsroom diversity

Is newsroom culture evolving?  With the resignations of The New York Times’ James Bennet, the Philadelphia Inquirer’s Stan Wischnowski, Philadelphia Magazine’s Tom McGrath, Roxboro Courier-Times’ Johnny Whitfield, Refinery 29’s Christene Barberich, and others, the industry is having a “reckoning moment” as conversations about diversity and racism gain momentum. In an online conversation about dismantling racism…


June 22, 2020
Introducing the Class of 2020: Rob Kleifield

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students graduating from college or Master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market. We hope they’ll meet future bosses and colleagues here, who will reach out and support them in building journalism’s future together.  Name: Rob Kleifield  School: Arizona State University…


June 22, 2020
In a creative rut? Try these exercises.

Creativity is a process. Maintaining a creative habit can be tough.  The following exercises can help you think visually and break through ruts. Word association games  When you get stuck breaking down a big concept for illustrations or photos — visualizing “community,” for example — try a word association game. Set a timer two minutes….


June 18, 2020
Telling stories about race and identity in the time of COVID-19 and George Floyd

Two months ago, Cara Anthony was writing about pandemic anxiety in public housing and the challenges COVID-19 places on multigenerational families. Then George Floyd was killed by Minneapolis police while in custody, and Anthony knew she needed to get back to Darnell Hill. She had first met Hill in February while reporting for Kaiser Health…


June 18, 2020
These design tools will help any journalist make better graphics

Practice doesn’t make perfect in design – but it certainly can improve your work over time. But where do you start if you don’t have funds for software or a background in design?  Dozens of free tools offer both templates and tutorials to help journalists produce infographics, stock photos, social cards, fliers and brochures, even…


June 18, 2020
A moment for change: Allies can make a difference

This article appeared first on Freedom Forum. Republished with permission. June 19 marks a turning point in American history. It is Juneteenth, the holiday that celebrates the end of slavery nationwide. We are at another turning point in our nation’s history, and people of good faith want to be part of that change. This week, the…


June 17, 2020
Trans voices were missing from SCOTUS ruling coverage. Tips for being more inclusive.

The Supreme Court’s landmark ruling protecting LGBTQ+ workers received widespread coverage in the media Monday. But the reporting largely lacked transgender sources, as Gillian Branstetter pointed out in a Twitter thread Tuesday. This is another facet of many newsrooms’ failures to provide inclusive journalism, two experts say. “I don’t imagine it would have taken a…


June 17, 2020
Introducing the Class of 2020: Benjamin Weiss

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students graduating from college or Master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market, in hopes they’ll meet future bosses and colleagues here who will reach out and support them in building journalism’s future together.  Name: Benjamin S. Weiss School: American University…


June 17, 2020
The danger of “paying your dues”

What does “paying your dues” mean in your newsroom, especially when it comes to hiring and promotions?  It’s customarily shorthand for “becoming qualified.” For the job. For the cool assignment. For advancement. But here’s a very troubling truth: When people create job descriptions and hiring criteria –  supposedly objective standards – they’re influenced by personal…


June 15, 2020
‘The right to be offended’: Political cartooning in an ideologically divided country

A political cartoon is worth a thousand words of opinion. And opinion has topped journalism-related headlines the last several days. An essay by Republican Sen. Tom Cotton of Arkansas caused upheaval at The New York Times. A cartoon published in a Missouri newspaper shook up the family ownership.  Political cartoons can particularly rankle an audience….


June 15, 2020
Fund aids Black journalists amid pandemic and protest coverage

It didn’t take long for donors to answer the call: $32,000 in 48 hours.  The convergence of the pandemic, economic stress and the killing of George Floyd has left Black journalists covering a historic intersection of their personal and professional lives. The work has taken a toll. “While publications ask Black journalists — both freelance…


June 15, 2020
Introducing the Class of 2020: Gabrielle Caracciolo

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students graduating from college or Master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market. We hope they’ll meet future bosses and colleagues here, who will reach out and support them in building journalism’s future together.  Name: Gabrielle Caracciolo School: Syracuse University Location:…


June 12, 2020
Public opinion polling and political backlash: “It goes with the turf”

Public opinion polling is a staple of political reporting. And campaigns love to second-guess them. So it wasn’t unusual for President Donald Trump to tweet his disapproval of a CNN poll this week that had him trailing Democratic opponent Joe Biden by 14 points. What was different was the Trump campaign’s demand on Wednesday for…


June 12, 2020
How to build your professional network, virtually

The handshake is a relic. So, perhaps, is the business card. As in-person conferences and job fairs remain on pause, the art of networking has evolved. Remote connections are the new norm, and those who seek to make the most of the new reality also must adapt. The big challenge is finding avenues to meet…


June 12, 2020
Introducing the Class of 2020: Donny Morrison

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students graduating from college or Master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market, in hopes they’ll meet future bosses and colleagues here who will reach out and support them in building journalism’s future together.  Name: Donny Morrison School: University of Oregon…


June 11, 2020
How to strengthen your coverage of disabilities during the pandemic

Nearly one-fifth of the U.S. population lives with an intellectual or physical disability. Multiply that number by their families and friends, says Kristin Gilger, and you get a sense of how large the audience is for inclusive reporting.  “There is some very good coverage being done about how people with disabilities are being affected by…


June 11, 2020
‘It’s pure schadenfreude’: Why mugshot galleries are going but not gone

This week, major newspaper publisher Gannett stopped sharing mugshot galleries on GateHouse Media websites, joining a handful of other newsrooms including the Houston Chronicle, WRAL and WCPO. The move is part of a larger effort to address racial inequities and curb the spread of negative stereotypes. “Mugshot galleries presented without context may feed into negative…


June 10, 2020
Navigating PACER: How to deep dive the federal court system

Health scams. Protest arrests. Civil rights violations. The common denominator for many journalists pursuing those stories these days is PACER, a government website that provides case and docket information from U.S. federal courts. Seamus Hughes, Deputy Director of the Program on Extremism at George Washington University and an expert PACER user, shared his skills Wednesday…


June 10, 2020
Introducing the Class of 2020: Verónica Del Valle

The National Press Club Journalism Institute is spotlighting the next generation of journalists, students graduating from college or Master’s programs this spring into a challenging job market, in hopes they’ll meet future bosses and colleagues here who will reach out and support them in building journalism’s future together.  Name: Verónica Del Valle School: American University  Location: Washington,…


June 4, 2020
Don’t stop with protest stories, start covering systemic racism

Journalists are doing a remarkable job of documenting this moment. Even in the face of physical attacks and the health threat of a pandemic, they are delivering compelling images and memorable stories of nationwide protest in the wake of the killing of George Floyd.  The best way to honor that work is to be as…


June 2, 2020
Allies know they need to learn; here’s help

The last time I led a “Do You Qualify as an Ally” webinar for the Freedom Forum’s Power Shift Project seems like a lifetime ago.  It was before COVID-19. Before Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor and George Floyd.  Before demonstrations across the country. It was February of this year.  So much has happened, yet so much remains…


May 29, 2020
You’re covering racial justice; are you heeding diverse voices?

As newsrooms cover two Black Americans, George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, their deaths and the aftermath, journalists are making critical decisions. As those stories develop, judgment calls happen in a moment. And as journalists choose words, images, interviewees, focus and context, we know this: a majority of the top managers in newsrooms are white.  You can read about journalism’s…


May 27, 2020
Five years from now, how will you look back on this moment?

It is May of 2020. We are marking the loss of 100,000 souls, victims of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States. Now think ahead five years. It is 2025, and you are being asked about this terrible time. You, the journalist who covered it as you lived it.  What do you remember with pride?…


May 22, 2020
Welcome, stranger – joining a new team from afar

How important is onboarding? It’s big, as demonstrated by a Harvard Business Review piece that researched the process and chose this as a headline: “Your New Employees Won’t Succeed Unless You Onboard Them Properly.”  According to the authors, onboarding does more than say hello. Done well, it expedites both social connections and information-sharing. People succeed…


May 20, 2020
Work friends matter – even from afar

Friendships motivate us to do more for each other. They ease stress and add laughter. They let us be ourselves and speak candidly. They amplify our pride in a job well done; celebrations are more fun when people we care about are cheering. Friendships happen at work. Or they used to. Here’s how: Lynnette Clemetson sat…


May 18, 2020
Good managers are guides, not guards

Leading remote teams demands a lot of managers. You need to be a better communicator than ever. Your emotional intelligence needs to be fine-tuned for each employee’s needs. Even if you hate detail work, you need to be a planner. But here’s one thing you should never be: a high-tech prison guard. Two recent articles make that clear. NPR…


May 14, 2020
Beware of ‘recency bias’ in your remote decision-making

Have you ever worked for managers who seemed to make decisions based on what they heard from the last person who talked with them? If so, you know how frustrating it was — and how it led to all kinds of needless jockeying among colleagues to get the last word with the boss. Those supervisors…


May 12, 2020
Don’t let social distancing silence shop talk

We gathered eight reporters to talk about how they took a Solutions Journalism approach to their COVID-19 stories. During our Power Shift “Taking Care of Journalists and Journalism” webinar, they explained how to dig deeper for systemic answers to problems like nursing shortages, lack of internet access, racial disparities in health care, and getting help to people who…


May 8, 2020
When to give the coach a rest

Whenever I teach managers about coaching and the power of questions, I anticipate this very legitimate question: Are there situations when coaching isn’t the right option, and you should just give people directions? The answer is yes – without a doubt. When should you give coaching a rest and just tell people what to do?…


May 7, 2020
Small gestures have big impact on motivation

We interrupt this program for an encouraging word. Journalists are nothing if not resourceful. They adapt to new tools and technology. They endure staff and budget cuts and still produce quality. They find information people want to hide. And now, whether at home, in eerily-underpopulated newsrooms, or from safe-as-we-can-make-them field assignments, they are delivering essential…


May 5, 2020
How do you help when someone tells you they’re stressed?

A colleague tells you he’s feeling more stressed as the weeks go by.  Do you: Tell him it’s normal these days and not to worry. Explain what you do when you feel anxious. Ask him to tell you more. Trust me, #3 is your best option. It allows you to be an informed coach, rather…


May 1, 2020
Do you practice “connector etiquette”?

The world needs more Connectors these days — more people who network on behalf of others. They link people to share ideas and opportunities; to give or get advice and help. As someone who tries to be a good connector by reaching out to others or responding when they ask to send people my way, I’ve…


April 30, 2020
Damn the distance, be a connector

I looked at my email inbox. The top message bore the subject line “Touching Base.” The sender was a friend – someone who attended one of my leadership seminars years ago and keeps in touch. Sometimes he sends an article I might find interesting. Other times he’s looking for info I might provide. Our exchanges…


April 27, 2020
Check your idiosyncrasies

We’d like to think we’re very good employees. (Especially when it’s time for annual evaluations, right?) But none of us is perfect. We all have idiosyncrasies. They’re not career killers like dishonesty or gross incompetence. Instead, they’re quirks – the kind of habits our co-workers cope with and work around, especially when we have plenty…


April 24, 2020
How to cope when you’re tethered to your desk

I had a Zoom huddle with broadcast and digital news managers of the TEGNA stations group this week. This was an open forum for all who wanted to offer ideas, ask questions, and share status reports about leading during pandemic times. The company offered it for both the learning and the camaraderie. Attendance was voluntary. …


April 22, 2020
Check on your editors

This pandemic has produced an abundance of powerful and painful stories. We worry – as we should – about the resilience of the reporters and photographers bearing witness to COVID-19’s impact on human life. Behind those reporters and photographers are editors who make their stories stronger and clearer, more understandable and relatable. They see every…


April 20, 2020
Getting Zoomed-out? Tips to make video gatherings more user-friendly

I like Zoom well enough. And wow, have I been using it. In the last two weeks, it’s been my platform for teaching six Loyola Chicago classes, moderating a Power Shift Project webinar, taking part in an advisory board meeting, delivering leadership pep talks for a TV station’s town hall meetings, and leading three training sessions for the Online…


April 16, 2020
Brevity is efficient – until it’s deficient

You’re bombarded with communication – text, email, Slack, phone call, Zoom – sometimes all at the same time. When you’re on overload, your written messages may be brief, for efficiency’s sake. But short takes can be misread as dismissive, frustrated, angry or unhappy, when that’s not your intent. Misunderstandings happen when: There’s a power differential. You…


April 15, 2020
What phase has your remote team entered?

There’s a classic theory about the life cycle of teams. The late psychology professor Bruce Tuckman coined these memorable terms for team development way back in 1965, and they’re taught to this day: Forming – the group gets going, identifies roles, goals and responsibilities; there’s lots of energy Storming – reality hits; not everything works, people get frustrated…


April 14, 2020
Good leadership delivers

Advice from Jill Geisler, Bill Plante Chair in Leadership & Media Integrity, Loyola University Chicago and Freedom Forum Fellow in Women’s Leadership Leaders need to know the right words for the moment. But on election night, there’s one message journalists treasure most: A tip of the hat to my friend George Stanley, editor of the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel,…


April 13, 2020
What advice can we give the next generation of journalists, poised to join the profession in a pandemic?

The journalism students sent me their questions in advance. Most were variations of these: “What advice can you give us in applying for jobs at a time like this? Are employers even looking to hire? Do you recommend we continue applying for positions?” As I prepared to talk with a class of graduating seniors, I…


April 9, 2020
‘Are you OK?’ Great bosses ask then act

A few columns ago, writing about resilience, I advised managers “In addition to asking ‘What are you doing?’, ask “How are you doing?”  When I write things like that, I sometimes question myself. Isn’t this just stating the obvious? Who wouldn’t know this?  At the same time, I’ve learned never to assume that managers are automatically…


April 8, 2020
How to meet the needs of introverts and extroverts from a social distance

There’s a lot of stereotyping around introversion and extroversion on any given day. It can get worse when we apply that thinking to working at a “social distance.” To start: Don’t assume that Introverts are shy or anti-social. They lead meetings, teach classes, make speeches and anchor newscasts (yes, of the many anchors in my leadership…


April 6, 2020
How do I provide feedback when I’m barely keeping up with all my work?

I had a talk this weekend with an editor I respect. She’s leading ambitious and ever-expanding coverage of the coronavirus on multiple platforms. Her staff is serving the public’s insatiable appetite for trustworthy news.  But the editor worries that she’s letting her hard-working team down. She can’t keep up with the feedback they deserve.  On…


April 3, 2020
Virtual applause to real heroes on your team

We treasure our journalism superstars; the master muckrakers, sense-makers and storytellers. Always will. Now, let’s give some love to a few other newsroom heroes, whose efforts, in the midst of chaos, make everyone better. They lift the team. They lead from wherever they are. Here’s a salute to: The MacGyvers: They are the wizards of…


April 2, 2020
Managing the “give” and “get” ledger

Great bosses know that we all keep a mental ledger of what we give to our workplace and what we feel we are getting in return. Here’s what’s interesting about the “give” side of our ledgers: Our “gives” are very clear to us. We keep track of what we’ve done, the degree of difficulty, the extra…


April 1, 2020
When WFH means too much ‘give’ and too little ‘get’

For those accustomed to working in a newsroom or classroom, the switch to working from home seemed instantaneous, even miraculous. How did people make the shift so fast, so inventively, so cooperatively?  They drew on their session of mission, their adaptability, and frankly, their desire to have jobs.  Now, they’re doing the best they can…


March 30, 2020
When they’re hurting

Your staff is on the front lines of history right now. They are helping the world bear witness to fear and courage, suffering and relief, success and failure, praise and blame –  and relentless tragedy.  They’re doing this under the shadow of several excruciating realities. The tragic stories will increase in the days ahead. Some…


March 27, 2020
Work from home Bingo

You’ve mastered social distancing. Adapted your communication habits. Learned that most of your furniture isn’t especially ergonomically friendly. Your eyeballs are rarely off a screen. Your normal quest for perfection is dialed down to “good enough for now.” You miss the sounds and serendipity of the newsroom (the smells, not so much). To remind you…


March 26, 2020
You’re an “Instant Editor” – what now?

In crisis coverage, we learn to wear new hats. Beats are shifting, roles are changing – all to meet the needs of the day.  What if you’ve been asked to edit, and you’ve never been an editor before? Trust your journalistic chops and Spidey-sense. If you know what makes a good story and have a…


March 25, 2020
How can I show I’m a manager who ‘gets it’?

Why is it that the same message, sent by two different leaders, can be received in different ways — one has impact, the other seems like platitudes?  My grandmother knew. Granny always told us, “Consider the source.” Those three words tell an important story of credibility and trust. Those qualities are critical when leaders are trying…


March 25, 2020
‘We are not doctors’: 16 top leaders share tips for supporting their newsrooms

There’s a real hunger for tips, solutions and tribal connections among journalists right now. Why else would hundreds of them, busy as they are, take part in the Power Shift Project’s first “COVID-19: Taking Care of Journalists and Journalism” webinar this week? Sixteen top leaders from all platforms shared practical advice and fielded questions.  We recorded the…


March 23, 2020
And now, a word from management… How do I find the right words to encourage the team?

Managing journalists is especially challenging. We hire them for their ability to question authority and resist spin. And then they apply those same skills when dealing with — us. They challenge managers, look skeptically at our decisions, and even mock our memos.  And yet, we love them, largely because we behaved the same way when…


March 20, 2020
How do we resolve real conflict in a virtual newsroom?

Here’s a real challenge for virtual teams: distance can reduce empathy. It’s harder to see the world through someone else’s eyes when you don’t often see their face. Here are some truths and tips to reduce conflict and misunderstanding. The more important a message is, the more it benefits from what scholars call the “richest”…


March 19, 2020
These are stressful times. How do leaders help us stay resilient?

Resilience isn’t a quality, it’s a journey. It’s measured by the time, effort and energy it takes to move from anxiety to calm, sadness to smiling, self-doubt to confidence and from hurting to healing. It’s important for newsroom leaders to know that this journey varies for each of us – and that can be a…


March 18, 2020
How can journalists stay focused working from home with laundry, dishes, kids distracting us?

How do I stay focused when I can see the laundry/dishes piling up, the dog has his leash in his mouth, and the kids are on extended spring break?  Here’s the dirty little secret — no, make that clean and virus-free little secret — of working from home: You will work as much and probably…


March 16, 2020
How should smart managers be looking ahead?

It’s always tempting for managers to focus on today’s report. In crisis, leaders must be looking miles ahead. To that end, some questions for leaders: Are you extending your staffing plans as never before? Think at least 8 weeks ahead. How will you sustain momentum while building in rest for the weary? That includes you….


March 13, 2020
Communicating clearly during a crisis

Q: How do I keep my boss informed without driving them crazy while working remotely? A: The easiest way to miscommunicate is to make assumptions about what others want or need. Now’s the time to make everything easier with one question: “What’s the best way to communicate with you — and when?” Get clarity on two types…